Categories
Crossword Practice

practice c1 arts crossword

Arts & Media Crossword

Instructions

  1. Please make sure you have studied the practice resources for this topic – crosswords are a way of testing your memory, and some of the definitions are not precise.
  2. Click on the ‘Start Solving!’ button to activate the crossword window.
  3. You can access an on-screen keyboard by clicking on the icon in the top menu bar.
  4. You can see all the definitions and select from the list by clicking on the icon on the right of the top menu bar.
  5. Click on the first space of a word to select it. Click again to change direction where horizontal and vertical words intersect.
  6. If you use an incorrect letter, it will appear in red.
  7. Happy crossword solving!!
Categories
Flashcards Practice

practice c1 arts media

Arts & Media

Categories
Practice

practice c1 arts reading

Extra! Extra! Read all about it!

Introduction

Introduction

What do you know about the Great Depression in the United States?
What caused instability in the US economy in the late 1920s?
What were the main consequences of the depression?

Reading 1

Reading

General Comprehension

1. Quickly scan the unordered text below and decide which of the following statements is correct.

In 1929, the fastest way to hear about breaking news was by

a) listening to the radio.

b) getting your shoes shined.

c) buying a special type of newspaper.

d) talking to someone who looked well informed.

Answer

c) An ‘extra’ was a special publication containing the most up-to-date news. It was produced as important events or situations became known. There are a several references to this in the text:

“Sir, the latest edition!…” / “…you won’t hear it on the wireless. Only here in the extra edition.” / The extra edition—fresh off the press… / “…We get to shout it from the rooftops.” / …the thrill of being the first to deliver the news…

Click to restart

Reading 2

Reading for Detail

Complete Text

The sun set, casting a warm glow on the busy streets of New York City. Newsboys moved through the crowds, their shouts filling the evening air. Among them was young Tommy, a scruffy kid with a cap pulled low, so it almost covered his eyes.

“Extra! Extra! Read all about it!” Tommy’s voice cracked as he waved a crumpled newspaper in the air, his thin frame lost under the weight of the headline shouting from the front page.

The year was 1929, and the Great Depression had tightened its grip. The stock market had crashed, fortunes evaporated, and hope seemed scarce. But Tommy knew one thing: people were hungry for the latest news.

He headed towards a well-dressed businessman, pushing through the crowd like an agile cat. “Sir, the latest edition! The headlines will make your head spin!”.
The man glanced at Tommy, his brow furrowing. “What’s with all the fuss, boy?”
Tommy thrust the paper into the man’s hands. “Wall Street in ruins! Banks collapsing! Read all about it!”
The man’s eyes widened as he scanned the big, bold letters. “My God,” he whispered. “How could this happen?”
Tommy shrugged his shoulders. “Beats me, mister. But it’s all there, and you won’t hear it on the wireless. Only here in the extra edition.”

The extra edition—fresh off the press, ink still wet, stories hitting the streets within minutes of the breaking news reaching the news desks.

Tommy’s heart raced as he continued his rounds. He passed a shoeshine stand, where old Mr. Higgins sat, polishing a pair of old, worn shoes. “Mr. Higgins!” Tommy called. “Get your news here!”
Mr. Higgins raised his spectacles to look at the headline. “Market crash, eh? Well, I’ll be damned. What’s the world coming to?”
Tommy leaned in, lowering his voice. “They say fortunes went up like smoke. But you know what? We’re the lucky ones. We get to shout it from the rooftops.”
Mr. Higgins grinned. “You’re smart, kid. Keep it up.”

And so, Tommy continued through the city’s streets—past carts selling apples, past newsstands with yesterday’s news, past the clatter of streetcars. He felt excited by the power of words, the thrill of being the first to deliver the news to the masses.
“Extra! Extra!” he shouted. “Read all about it!” And the city listened.

Click to restart

Vocab

Vocabulary

Click to restart

End of Practice

Complete Text

The sun set, casting a warm glow on the busy streets of New York City. Newsboys moved through the crowds, their shouts filling the evening air. Among them was young Tommy, a scruffy kid with a cap pulled low, so it almost covered his eyes.

“Extra! Extra! Read all about it!” Tommy’s voice cracked as he waved a crumpled newspaper in the air, his thin frame lost under the weight of the headline shouting from the front page.

The year was 1929, and the Great Depression had tightened its grip. The stock market had crashed, fortunes evaporated, and hope seemed scarce. But Tommy knew one thing: people were hungry for the latest news.

He headed towards a well-dressed businessman, pushing through the crowd like an agile cat. “Sir, the latest edition! The headlines will make your head spin!”.
The man glanced at Tommy, his brow furrowing. “What’s with all the fuss, boy?”
Tommy thrust the paper into the man’s hands. “Wall Street in ruins! Banks collapsing! Read all about it!”
The man’s eyes widened as he scanned the big, bold letters. “My God,” he whispered. “How could this happen?”
Tommy shrugged his shoulders. “Beats me, mister. But it’s all there, and you won’t hear it on the wireless. Only here in the extra edition.”

The extra edition—fresh off the press, ink still wet, stories hitting the streets within minutes of the breaking news reaching the news desks.

Tommy’s heart raced as he continued his rounds. He passed a shoeshine stand, where old Mr. Higgins sat, polishing a pair of old, worn shoes. “Mr. Higgins!” Tommy called. “Get your news here!”
Mr. Higgins raised his spectacles to look at the headline. “Market crash, eh? Well, I’ll be damned. What’s the world coming to?”
Tommy leaned in, lowering his voice. “They say fortunes went up like smoke. But you know what? We’re the lucky ones. We get to shout it from the rooftops.”
Mr. Higgins grinned. “You’re smart, kid. Keep it up.”

And so, Tommy continued through the city’s streets—past carts selling apples, past newsstands with yesterday’s news, past the clatter of streetcars. He felt excited by the power of words, the thrill of being the first to deliver the news to the masses.
“Extra! Extra!” he shouted. “Read all about it!” And the city listened.

Audio Story (To download, click on the 3 dots -on the right of audio player- and select ‘Download’)

Categories
Flashcards Practice

flashcards arts media 1

Arts & Media: The News

Study Tips

1. Listen to each word as your read the written form.
2. Say the word and listen again to compare your pronunciation.
3. Flip the card and read the definition.
4. Say the word to complete the example sentence. (Flip the card back to check if necessary.)
5. Listen to the example sentence, and say it yourself.

breaking news

Click / Hover

PHRASE: information about an event that is currently occurring or developing

“_____ news just in, the Prime Minister now confirming his resignation.”

      Listen

coverage

Click / Hover

NOUN: reporting/ analysis of a specific subject or event

“For _____ of the latest news, local, national and international, stay tuned.”

      Listen

feature

Click / Hover

NOUN: special article or programme, about a particular subject

“More of our _____ on the Post Office scandal after this short break.”

      Listen

run a story

Click / Hover

PHRASE: print in a newspaper/ magazine

“While most tabloids are _____ today, The Express focuses on the house-buying crisis.”

      Listen
Categories
Wordlists

Wordlists-C1

C1 Advanced Wordlists

Description

Welcome to LLT Wordlists, where you can find CEFR C1 vocabulary lists by subject referenced from the Cambridge Vocabulary Profile. LLT wordlist items all come with audio and a pop-up definition. We hope you find them useful.

Categories
Wordlists

Wordlists c1 arts

C1 Advanced Wordlists

Arts & Media

  Key:     Listen    ⓘ Pop-up definition

 cinema ⓘ coverage ⓘ extra ⓘ
 illustration ⓘ index ⓘ on-air ⓘ
 run a story ⓘ sketch ⓘ subtitles ⓘ
 techno ⓘ telly ⓘ
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